IN SHORT

Today I looked for FastInvest reviews published or updated withing the last six months. I was only interested in those of them that gave a final score (it was always a system of five stars, with five meaning highest score). I also looked for opinions at portals, such as Trustpilot. With that I calculated an overall score for FastInvest, which turned out to be as low as 2.78 out of 5.0. Below, I’m showing details for that simple calculation, plus some basic data about this P2P lending platform.

Overall, I’m absolutely NOT recommending putting your money into this platform.

 

FastInvest: key facts

  • Webpage: https://www.fastinvest.com/en 
  • Buyback Guarantee: Yes
  • Auto-invest: Yes (minimalistic)
  • Secondary market: Yes
  • Loan categories: consumer loans
  • Loan rates: typically 9-13%
  • Investors: ca. 30,000
  • Currencies: EUR, PLN
  • Regulation (from their website): FAST INVEST LTD is not regulated under any financial services license and is an online peer-to-peer platform acting as an intermediary in the sale of claim rights between investors and loan originators.

Continue reading “FastInvest scores only 2.78 out of 5.0 in a meta-review”

IN SHORT

Today I looked for Iuvo Group reviews published or updated withing the last six months. I was only interested in those of them that gave a final score (it was always a system of five stars, with five meaning highest score). I also looked for opinions at portals, such as Trustpilot. With that I calculated an overall score for Iuvo Group, which turned out to be 4.32 out of 5.0. Below, I’m showing details for that simple calculation, some basic data about this P2P lending platform as well as any other information I believe you should know before deciding to invest.

 

Iuvo Group: key facts

  • Webpage: https://www.iuvo-group.com
  • Established: 2016
  • Country: Estonia
  • Buyback Guarantee: available for all loans
  • Auto-invest and manual investing available
  • Secondary market: available
  • Loan categories: consumer / business / mortgage / secured car loans
  • Average annual investment return: 9.2%
  • Amount of listed loans: 297 million EUR
  • Investors: ca. 20,000
  • Currencies: EUR, BGN, RON, PLN
  • Regulation: IUVO Group is regulated as a credit intermediary licensed by the Estonian Financial Commission Finantsinspeksioon. This means that they do not have approval from every national regulator, but act as a credit intermediary yet they follow the rules of  P2P Best Practices by FinanceEstonia (source)  

Continue reading “Iuvo Group scores 4.32 out of 5.0 in a meta-review”

Hi,

exactly four years ago, I started copying eToro investors / traders that I selected using the broker’s built-in search engine (profitable in last two years, already being copied by others), followed by manual filtering, to take into account fluctuations in yearly returns, composition of their portfolios etc. With that, I got a list of 10 people whom I started to copy on a demo account:

Continue reading “Copy trading with eToro: impressions, doubts and (ignored) lessons”

I’m using a consensus strategy to get a quality set of stocks to invest. The strategy relies on data from a number of sources, including Buy recommendations from several renowned stock data providers and analytical services. This is why I’m calling the approach the consensus strategy. Importantly, the stocks I’m getting there are generally believed to have a great potential to outperform the stock market in the coming months, they have a consensus recommendation of Buy, their fundamentals are scored considerably better than most stocks and their average target price by stock analysts is above current market valuation.

With the consensus strategy, in order to consider buying the stock’s shares, the following criteria need to be satisfied:

  • TheStreet score: A+ or A
  • Zacks Rank: 1 (Strong Buy), 2 (Buy) or 3 (Hold)
  • Weiss Ratings recommendation: A or B
  • Yahoo Finance recommendation: at least mixed Buy/Hold
  • MarketBeat recommendation: at least mixed Buy/Hold
  • Yahoo Finance target price: min. 5% higher than current price
  • MarketBeat target price: min. 5% higher than current price
  • Piotroski F-Score: min. 4
  • Moody’s Daily Credit Risk: 1 to 6
  • InvestorsObserver Overall Score: min. 50

IN SHORT

Today I looked for Viventor reviews published or updated withing the last six months. I was only interested in those of them that gave a final score (it was always a system of five stars, with five meaning highest score). I also looked for opinions at portals, such as Trustpilot. With that I calculated an overall score for Viventor, which turned out to be 3.8 out of 5.0. Below, I’m showing details for that simple calculation, some basic data about this P2P lending platform as well as any other information I believe you should know before deciding to invest.

 

Viventor: key facts

  • Webpage: https://www.viventor.com
  • Established: 2015
  • Country: Latvia
  • Buyback Guarantee: available for all loans
  • Auto-invest and manual investing available
  • Secondary market: available
  • Loan categories: consumer loans, business loans, real estate, leasing
  • Average annual investment return: 13.6%
  • Amount of funded loans: over 136 million EUR
  • Investors: ca. 7500
  • Currency: EUR
  • Regulation: not financially regulated but is under the commercial legislation acts of the Republic of Latvia

Continue reading “Viventor: conclusions from meta-analysis of recent reviews”

Market downturns provide us with a unique opportunity to invest at discounted stock prices and you might have experienced them a number of times already, like last spring or during the Great Recession of 2007-2009. In spite of the fact that we know it’s going to be happening over and over again, for some reason we often seem to be totally unprepared when it already takes place, or at least we fail to take full advantage of these opportunities. Why? Simply because you never know whether the bottom was already reached – and waiting for the stock market to rebounce, we finally realize it is 10-20% up already. Generally speaking, this is pretty normal and unless you are an extremly talented and/or disciplined stock analyst, your chances to time the market are quite low (see this article for more details). The same applies to the reverse scenario: the stocks are up (like the FAANG today) and it’s hard to determine whether one should keep them, hoping for higher gains, or maybe it’s already the right time to sell them, before the possibly massive selloff starts. So what can we do about this? Probably the easiest solution is to apply a popular investment strategy dubbed dollar-cost averaging (DCA) or constant dollar plan. Basically, the idea is to divide up the total amount to be invested into purchases done in regular intervals. For instance, having $10,000 to invest in AAPL, one could either try to time the market, executing a single purchase at the best possible price (this is the so called lump sum investing) or split it into smaller (let’s say $500) purchases executed monthly (DCA), which reduces the impact of price volatility on the overall performance of one’s portfolio and, generally speaking, often helps gaining higher yields. Continue reading “Modifying the dollar-cost averaging strategy for higher yields, part 1”